Individual Psychotherapy
Modalities

Psychodynamic

Psychodynamic therapy, also known as insight-oriented therapy, focuses on unconscious processes as they are manifested in a person’s present behavior. The goals of psychodynamic therapy are a client’s self-awareness and understanding of the influence of the past on present behavior. 

Strength-based Therapy

Strength-based therapy is a type of positive psychotherapy that focuses more on your internal strengths and resourcefulness, and less on weaknesses, failures, and shortcomings. This focus sets up a positive mindset that helps you build on your best qualities, find your strengths, improve resilience and change your worldview to one that is more positive. 

Includes mindful thinking.

 

Family Systems

Family systems theory (IFS) is a theory of human behavior that views the family as an emotional unit and uses systems thinking to describe the complex interactions in the unit. It is the nature of a family that its members are intensely connected emotionally.  The 'patient' is the family system. 

Like a mobile, when one piece gets moved, the whole unit moves/changes.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

A type of psychotherapy in which negative patterns of thought about the self and the world are challenged in order to alter unwanted behavior patterns or treat mood disorders (including depression, anxiety and others). It is  time-sensitive, structured, present-oriented and is directed toward solving current problems and teaching clients skills to modify dysfunctional thinking and behavior

 

Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) for Couples

EFT is a structured approach to couples therapy that was formulated in the 1980’s and has developed alongside the science of adult attachment and bonding to expand our understanding about what is happening in couple relationships. Created and researched by famed psychologist, Dr. Sue Johnson of 'Hold me Tight' fame. It looks at dynamic instead of content and is very effective. 

 

Mind-focused Therapy

Focuses on the beneficial effect of developing compassion within the development of self and others to increase well-being and aid recovery. Learning to be grounded and present are key factors.